Employment Policies

3.1 Americans with Disabilities Act ("ADA") and Disability Accommodations

It is the policy of Community College of Philadelphia to provide equal employment opportunity for all qualified individuals, including those with disabilities. The College will provide reasonable accommodations to enable such qualified individuals to perform the essential functions of their jobs provided that the accommodations do not impose an undue hardship on the College.

In order to request a reasonable accommodation, the ADA Request for Reasonable Accommodation Form must be completed by the individual and the Disability Status Determination Formmust be completed by the individual’s licensed health care practitioner. Both forms should be returned to the Associate Vice President for Human Resources.

To inquire about accommodations, please contact Human Resources, extension 8035.

View the ADA policy in its entirety

3.2 Religious Accommodation

Purpose

To prevent discrimination and ensure compliance on the basis of religion and provide guidance regarding the procedure by which religious accommodations will be provided to the College’s employees, applicants for employment, and students in accordance with Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended, the Pennsylvania Human Relations Act, and the Philadelphia Fair Practices Ordinance.

Accountability

Under the direction of the President, the Director of Diversity and Equity shall ensure compliance with this policy.  The Director of Diversity and Equity in conjunction with the Vice Presidents, Deans, and all other supervisory staff, shall implement this policy.

Policy

The Community College of Philadelphia prohibits discrimination based upon religion.  The College will provide reasonable religious accommodations when necessary for individuals to participate in employment and educational opportunities, as well as other college programs and activities, unless the accommodation poses an undue hardship on the College or requires the College to fundamentally alter the nature of a College course, program, or activity.

Procedures

Process for Employee Accommodation

An employee who requires a reasonable religious accommodation should make the request directly to his/her supervisor. If the supervisor determines that the request may pose an undue hardship for the department and/or interfere with the employee’s essential job functions, or if the supervisor otherwise has concerns about the accommodation request, the supervisor should contact the Director of Diversity and Equity. If there are concerns about the requested accommodation, the supervisor and/or the Director of Diversity and Equity may initiate discussions with the employee to determine whether an alternative accommodation would suffice. A supervisor may not unilaterally deny a request for a reasonable religious accommodation without first consulting the Director of Diversity and Equity.

Process for Applicant Accommodation

An applicant who requires a reasonable religious accommodation should make the request directly to the Human Resources Department.

If Human Resources determines that the request may pose an undue hardship on the College, Human Resources should contact the Director of Diversity and Equity. If there are concerns about the requested accommodation, the supervisor and/or the Director of Diversity and Equity may initiate discussions with the employee to determine whether an alternative accommodation would suffice. Human Resources may not unilaterally deny a request for a reasonable religious accommodation without first consulting the Director of Diversity and Equity

Process for Student Accommodation

A student who requires a reasonable religious accommodation should make the request directly to his/her course instructor. It is expected that the student will provide sufficient notice of the need for an accommodation to course instructors in order for the accommodation to be implemented. In the event that a student’s request for religious accommodation involves an alternative examination time or date, any make-up examinations given for purposes of test security must be comparable, in terms of format and difficulty, to the examinations given to the entire class. If there are concerns about the requested accommodation, the instructor should consult his/her department chair, dean or the Director of Diversity and Equity. An instructor may not unilaterally deny a request for a reasonable religious accommodation without first consulting the Director of Diversity and Equity. All religious accommodations for other College programs and activities outside of the classroom must be submitted to the Director of Diversity and Equity.

Complaints

Individuals who believe that there is a violation of this policy, disagree with a determination regarding a request for a reasonable religious accommodation, believe they have been treated in a discriminatory manner, or are experiencing harassment should contact the Director of Diversity and Equity. Complaints will be investigated in accordance with the procedure contained in the College’s Anti-Discrimination and Harassment Compliant Policy. An individual who files a complaint or participates in an investigation will be protected against retaliation. Complaints will be kept confidential to the extent possible.

Appeal

An employee who disagrees with the Director of Diversity and Equity’s determination may appeal by providing a written appeal to the college President. The President or his designee will make a decision regarding the appeal within 14 business days and render a written decision to the employee, the employee’s supervisor, and to the Director of Diversity and Equity concerning the accommodation request. The decision of the President or his/her designee is final.

To view the entire Religious Accommodation policy #356

3.3 Confidentiality

In the course of working at the College, faculty and staff may have access to confidential information about the College, our students and/or parents, co-workers or the public, including, but not limited to, information regarding student academic records, disciplinary matters, medical information and development plans. As a matter of state and federal law and/or College policy, such information must be held in strict confidence and not divulged to persons either within or outside the College community to protect individual privacy and College business.
                    
If it is important for someone in the College to know the details of a confidential matter, then it may be appropriate for an employee to share it or discuss it. An employee should always check with his/her supervisor for specific instructions regarding who should have access to privileged information and how it should be handled.

Faculty and staff who have access to student information should refer to the student handbook for the detailed College policy regarding the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), a federal law that provides students rights of access to education records and imposes regulations on the College in the release and disclosure of education records to third parties.

3.4 Conflicts of Interest

Employees have an obligation to conduct business in a manner that avoids actual or potential conflicts of interest. An actual or potential conflict of interest occurs when an employee is in a position to influence a decision that may result in a personal gain for that employee or for a relative because of the College’s business dealings. For the purposes of this policy, a relative is any person who is related by blood or marriage, or whose relationship with the employee is similar to that of persons who are related by blood or marriage.

Personal gain may result not only in cases where a staff member or relative has a significant ownership in a firm with which the College does business, but also when an employee or relative receives any kickback, bribe, substantial gift, or special gift, or special consideration as a result of any transaction or business dealings involving the College.

View the Conflict of Interest Policy.

3.5 Discipline - Staff 

For most breaches of College rules, the College is committed to the principle of progressive or corrective discipline.  For certain acts, including but not limited to violations of criminal law, immediate threats to person or property, theft, insubordination, misrepresentation of material information at the time of hire, falsification of time recorded, or acts which impair the mission of the College, the College may immediately suspend without pay or terminate an employee.  Failure or refusal to cooperate in or interference with an internal investigation is grounds for discipline up to and including immediate termination.  Each division of the College may have additional work rules, which may be enforced through the disciplinary process.

3.6 Discipline - Students

A Student Code of Conduct governs student life at the College. The code is found in the Student Handbook available from the Office of the Vice President for Academic and Student Success, room, M2-37, extension 8160. Students charged with violation of this code are subject to a student appeals procedure also found in the Student Handbook. The code provides for the right of staff to file complaints against students for violation of student rules of conduct.

3.7 Notice of Non-Discrimination

Community College of Philadelphia is committed to the principles of equal employment and equal educational opportunity and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, ancestry, creed, national origin, age, sexual orientation, religion, sex/gender, individuals with disabilities, protected veterans, marital status, genetic information, or any other protected category under the applicable Local, State, or Federal law.

Community College of Philadelphia is committed to achieving a diverse work force reflective of the communities it serves.  This diversity will be accomplished through the College’s Affirmative Action Plan and practices which encourage employees to develop their capabilities as part of careers at the College.  The College is committed to an outreach program designed to make information about employment opportunities known to diverse communities and to a welcoming environment where diversity is a source of institutional strength and advancement.  This statement is founded on the firm belief that fulfillment of employment and educational objectives must be a function of each individual’s abilities.  Successful attainment of affirmative action goals and support plans are considered essential to the fundamental mission of Community College of Philadelphia.  In making this statement, the College recognizes both a moral and legal responsibility. 

Inquiries concerning application of non-discrimination policies should be directed to:

Leila Lawrence
Director of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion and Title IX Coordinator
Community College of Philadelphia
1700 Spring Garden Street, Room M2-3 Philadelphia, PA 19130
Email:  
Telephone: 215-751-8036

3.8 Anti-Discrimination and Harassment Complaint Policy Section 504/Title IX

Purpose

The purpose of the Anti-Discrimination and Harassment Complaint Policy is to create an academic and working environment free of unlawful discrimination or harassment and to identify the procedures for handling complaints of discrimination and harassment.

The Community College of Philadelphia does not tolerate discrimination or harassment on the basis of age, color, disability, gender, gender identity, genetic information, national origin, marital status, political affiliation, race, religion, sex, sexual orientation, veteran status, or any other basis protected by law. Such behavior is inconsistent with the College’s commitment to excellence and to a community in which mutual respect is a core value as articulated in the College’s Mission, Vision, and Core Values Statements. The prohibition against unlawful discrimination and harassment applies to all levels and areas of College operations and programs, students, administrators, faculty, staff, volunteers, vendors, and contractors.

The College is subject to Titles VI and VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, sections 503 and 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, as amended, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act, the Equal Pay Act, the Vietnam Era Veterans’ Readjustment Assistance Act of 1974, Federal executive Order 11246, Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008 (GINA), the Clery Act, the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act (VAWA), and all other rules and regulations that are applicable.

Accountability

Under the direction of the President, the Director, Office of Diversity and Equity shall ensure compliance with this policy. The Director, Office of Diversity and Equity, in conjunction with the College’s Vice Presidents, Deans, and all other staff in a supervisory capacity shall implement this policy. As set forth in the Policy Against Sexual Misconduct, Relationship Violence, and Stalking, all College employees have a duty to report claims of sexual misconduct, including sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, or stalking to Leila Lawrence, Director of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion and Title IX Coordinator at , Room M2-3, 1700 Spring Garden Street, Philadelphia PA 19130, (215) 751-8036.

Prohibited Acts 

Discrimination/Harassment – any conduct directed toward an individual or group based upon one or more of the following categories or traits: age, color, disability, gender, gender identity, genetic information, national origin, marital status, political affiliation, race, religion, sex, sexual orientation, veteran status that is sufficiently severe or pervasive to a reasonable person that it alters an individual’s employment condition, educational environment or participation in a College activity and creates intimidating, offensive or a hostile environment for employment, education, or participation in a College activity. Harassment may include, but is not limited to, repeated remarks of a demeaning nature, implied or explicit threats, slurs, innuendoes or gestures, demeaning jokes, stories, pictures, touching or other forms of physical harassment or objects or activities directed at an individual based on any of the above categories or groups.

Note:  Although this policy prohibits sexual harassment and other sexual misconduct, including but not limited to sexual assault, such conduct is specifically governed by the College’s Policy Against Sexual Misconduct, Relationship Violence, and Stalking, which is available on MyCCP on the College Policies and Procedures webpage.

Retaliation – It is a violation of this policy to retaliate against any party for participating in a discrimination/harassment investigation. Retaliation includes any adverse treatment that is reasonably likely to deter the complainant or others from filing a charge of discrimination/harassment or participating in a discrimination/harassment investigation. Retaliation can be verbal, written, graphic, electronic or physical.

Knowingly Filing False Complaints – Knowingly filing a false complaint of discrimination/ harassment in retaliation is a violation of this policy. Such conduct may be pursued using the steps followed for a complaint of discrimination/harassment, and if found to have occurred, will result in disciplinary action that may include termination or expulsion.

Requirements

The Community College of Philadelphia is committed to creating and maintaining a working and learning environment for all faculty, staff, and students, which is free of discriminatory or harassing conduct or communication. The College will not tolerate any conduct which creates an intimidating, hostile, threatening or offensive working or learning environment.

The College views all forms of discrimination/harassment and all attempts to commit such acts as a serious offense and will impose disciplinary action up to and including expulsion, required withdrawal, suspension or termination. The College is committed to maintaining an environment free from discrimination/harassment toward visitors. Discrimination/harassment by employees, students or contractors toward visitors will not be tolerated by the College and will be addressed by this policy.

Duty to Investigate Harassment Complaints

Allegations of harassment require that the College take action to investigate and remedy the situation, if harassment has occurred. The College is legally obligated to take action to eliminate harassment that is known or should have been known to anyone in an executive, managerial or supervisory capacity. Employees in supervisory roles must report allegations of harassment to Leila Lawrence, Director of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion and Title IX Coordinator.
Scope

These procedures apply to prohibited acts (defined above) by any employee (including student worker), applicant, volunteer, vendor, or contractor of the College.

Reporting Options

  • Any employee, faculty, or student may make a report to Leila Lawrence, Director of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion and Title IX Coordinator
  • Any faculty or staff member may also make a report to their immediate superior, who must report the allegations to the Director of the Office of Diversity and Equity
  • Students may also make a report to the Office of Academic and Student Success, the Office of the Dean of Students, or any faculty member, who must report the allegations to the Director of the Office of Diversity and Equity.

Investigation and Resolution Procedures

Alleged Student Perpetrators

The investigation and resolution of reports of discrimination/harassment allegedly perpetrated by or between students who are not acting in the capacity of a college employee falls within the jurisdiction of the Judicial Affairs Officer.  The Judicial Affairs Officer will address the complaint in accordance with procedures described in the Student Code of Conduct located in the Student Handbook.

Alleged Employee or Third Party Perpetrators

Discrimination/harassment allegedly perpetrated toward students or employees by a college employee or third party falls under the jurisdiction of the Office of Diversity and Equity and complaints of this nature will be addressed in accordance with the procedures listed herein.
The complaint process consists of consultations with the Office of Diversity and Equity, and an informal and/or formal investigation process for acts of discrimination/harassment as described below:

Consultations

Consultations may occur with employees or students.  Management may also consult before taking other action.

The Office of Diversity and Equity will discuss the situation with the complainant and recommend steps the person may take toward resolution of the problem and/or may refer the inquirer to other appropriate resources for assistance. Please note that in some cases, information reported to the Office of Diversity and Equity in a consultation may require the Office of Diversity and Equity to conduct an investigation in accordance with the procedures set forth herein.

Informal Complaint Process

Informal complaints are filed verbally.  In the informal complaint process, the Office of Diversity and Equity may mediate or conduct an informal investigation at the discretion of Leila Lawrence, Director of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion and Title IX Coordinator. Informal complaint resolution is not available in cases involving sexual assault or violence.

The Director of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion and Title IX Coordinator, Leila Lawrence, may attempt to negotiate an informal resolution to the informal complaint of alleged discrimination/harassment.  If attempts to reach an informal resolution are unsuccessful, the Director of the Office of Diversity and Equity will submit the complaint to the formal complaint process. All complainants have the right to end the informal process at any time and proceed to the formal process.

Formal Complaint Process

Formal complaints shall be in writing, and will be investigated even if the complaint is unsigned.
All complaints will be promptly investigated:

Complaints should be filed within 30 business days of the occurrence of the alleged objectionable behavior whenever practicable.

Internal investigations will be concluded within 60 days of submission whenever practicable, to determine if there is a basis to present witnesses and any other pertinent evidence. The individual accused of discrimination/harassment will be advised of the allegations, the source of the complaint if known, and then given the opportunity to respond to the allegations. If an internal investigation cannot be concluded within 60 days, the appropriate parties will be advised and a projected conclusion day will be announced.

Should cause be found to support the allegations, Leila Lawrence - Director of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion and Title IX Coordinator, will identify appropriate remedial actions which may include disciplinary action up to and including termination, and he will report those recommendations to the person responsible for the division/department in which the alleged discrimination/harassment occurred. The appropriate vice president, dean, or department head shall implement the recommendations made by the Director, Office of Diversity and Equity to resolve the situation within two weeks of receiving the findings. A notice of the findings resulting from the complaint shall be distributed to all relevant parties. The College will also take steps to prevent the reoccurrence of any discrimination/ harassment and to correct its discriminatory effects on the complainant and others if appropriate.

Appeals

Both parties may file an appeal if there is a disagreement with the results and conclusion of the complaint. An appeal must be made in writing. For all student complaints initiating with the Judicial Hearing Committee, the appeal process shall proceed in accordance with the College’s established judicial process as outlined in Article VI: Judicial Policies, in the Student Handbook. All complaints handled by the Office of Diversity and Equity will be addressed in accordance with the appeals procedures listed as follows: 

All appeals must be filed with the President or his/her designee within ten (10) working days of the receipt of the investigator’s decision. The appeal must state why the complainant believes the result and conclusion is unsatisfactory. The President or his/her designee shall review the record and investigate further if deemed necessary. Within twenty-one (21) working days of the date of the filing of the appeal, all parties will receive notice of the President’s or his/her designee’s decision in writing. The President’s or his/her designee’s decision will be final and binding on all parties.

Cooperation

Employees have an obligation to cooperate in the investigation of any such complaint. Management at every level has an affirmative responsibility to ensure that recommendations for corrective action are promptly implemented.

Confidentiality

The confidentiality of all parties involved in a discrimination/harassment complaint shall be protected as long as it does not interfere with the College’s obligations to investigate allegations of misconduct or take corrective action.

Withdrawing Complaint

The complainant may, at any time, request to have his/her complaint withdrawn.  In the case of an informal complaint, the request can be made verbally. Requests to withdraw formal complaints should be made in writing to Leila Lawrence, Director of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion and Title IX Coordinator. At its discretion the Office of Diversity and Equity may pursue the investigation and seek remedy if the issues brought forth during the investigation have an adverse impact against other employees, students, or the College.

External Reporting

Discrimination/harassment is prohibited by federal, state, and local law. In addition to the internal process described, individuals may pursue complaints directly with government agencies that deal with unlawful discrimination/harassment claims, e.g., the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), the Office for Civil Rights (OCR), the U.S. Department of Education, Pennsylvania Human Rights Commission, and the Philadelphia Human Rights Commission.

To view the policy in its entirely, please go to:

View the Anti-Discrimination and Harassment Complaint Policy

3.8.1 Harassment Prevention Training

Harassment prevention training is mandatory for all full and part-time College employees and must be completed every three years. Notification of training sessions for specific employee groups is communicated through the College C-News announcements.

Training can also be completed online at http://training.newmedialearning.com/psh/ccphila in lieu of attending a workshop.

Please contact the Office of Diversity and Equity at extension 8036 to register for an upcoming session or if you have questions regarding the date of your last sexual harassment prevention training.

3.8.2 Equal Employment Opportunity

Purpose

To establish and outline our commitment to the principle of equal employment opportunity by means of our Affirmative Action Program.

Accountability

Under the direction of the President, the Director of Diversity & Equity shall ensure compliance with this policy. The Director of Diversity & Equity, in conjunction with the Vice Presidents and Deans, and all other staff in a supervisory capacity, shall implement this policy. The duties of the Director of Diversity & Equity includes developing policy statements, affirmative action programs and internal and external communication techniques; identifying problem areas; assisting managers and supervisors in arriving at solutions to problems; designing and implementing auditing and reporting systems; serving as liaison between the College and enforcement agencies; monitoring compliance with this policy.

Policy

The Community College of Philadelphia is committed to and reaffirms its policy of equal employment opportunity to all applicants, employees, and students without regard to race, color, religion, sex (except where sex is a bona fide occupational qualification), sexual orientation, age, national or ethnic origin, disability, genetic information, gender identification, or status as a disabled or Vietnam era veteran status and to provide each and every individual with the ability to work in a safe, productive and professional work environment that is free from discriminatory practices. In achieving equal opportunity, we commit ourselves to:

  • Recruit, hire, train, and promote the most qualified persons without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, age, national or ethnic origin, disability or status as a disabled or Vietnam era veteran.
  • Ensure that promotion decisions are in accordance with equal employment opportunity requirements by imposing only valid, job-related requirements for promotional opportunities.
  • Ensure that all personnel actions relating to compensation, benefits, transfers, retention, terminations, training, social and recreational programs and education are administered in a nondiscriminatory manner.

Dissemination of Policy

The College will continue to make its equal employment opportunity policy known internally by the following means:

  • Conducting meetings with personnel to explain the intent of the policy, the President's commitment to the policy and individual responsibilities for effective implementation.
  • Explaining the policy thoroughly in employee orientation and management training programs.
  • Posting the policy on bulletin boards and in internal publications.
  • Including nondiscrimination clauses in all collective bargaining agreements and reviewing all contractual provisions to ensure that they are nondiscriminatory.
  • The College will continue to disseminate its policy externally by:
    • Informing all recruiting sources of the policy.
    • Incorporating the policy into all purchase orders, leases and contracts covered by Executive Order 11246, as amended.

Assuring equal employment opportunity is a fundamental and direct responsibility of all levels of management. Managers and department heads are required to comply with government regulations and the affirmative action goals of the College.
                                           
The College is dedicated to the task of institutional self-examination in accordance with federal equal employment guidelines and Board policies, and to the correction of any deficiencies which are found to exist through the adoption of appropriate action plans and programs.

These statement are founded on a firm belief that fulfillment of employment and education objectives must be a function of each individual's ability and interest. Successful attainment of goals and support plans is considered essential to the fundamental mission of the College. In making this statement, the College is recognizing both a moral and legal responsibility.

3.8.3 Disabled, Vietnam-Era and Other Eligible Veteran’s EEO Policy

Purpose

To establish a policy to ensure equal employment opportunity without regard to veteran status in accordance with the Vietnam-Era Veterans’ Readjustment Assistance Act of 1974, as amended.

Accountability

Under the direction of the President, the Director of Diversity & Equity and Affirmative Action shall ensure compliance with this policy. The Director of Diversity & Equity, in conjunction with the Vice Presidents and Deans, and all other staff in a supervisory capacity, shall implement this policy.

Definitions

  1. Disabled Veteran - A person entitled to disability compensation under laws administered by the Veteran’s Administration for disability rated at 30% or more, or a person whose discharge or release from active duty was for a disability incurred or aggravated in the line of duty.
  2. Qualified Special Disabled Veteran - a Special Disabled Veteran as defined in 41 C.F.R. Part 60-250.2 who satisfies the requisite skill, experience, education and other job-related requirements of the employment position such veteran holds or desires, and who, with or without reasonable accommodation, can perform the essential functions of such position.
  3. Veteran of the Vietnam-Era - a person who served on active duty for a period of more than 180 days in the Republic of Vietnam between February 28, 1961 and May 7, 1975 or between August 5, 1964 through May 7, 1975 in an area other than Vietnam with a discharge or release other than dishonorable discharge.
  4. Other Eligible Veterans - A person who served on active duty during a war or in a campaign or expedition for which a campaign badge has been authorized.

Policy

The Community College of Philadelphia provides fair employment, educational and career opportunities to every qualified individual. Accordingly, the College will take affirmative action to employ, advance in employment and otherwise treat qualified special disabled veterans, veterans of the Vietnam-Era and other eligible veterans without discrimination in all employment and educational practices.

The College will not discriminate against any employee or applicant for employment because he or she is a special disabled veteran or veteran of the Vietnam era or is otherwise eligible. The College will recruit, hire, train and promote persons in all job titles, and ensure that all other personnel actions are administered without regard to special disabled veteran or Vietnam era veteran status; and ensure that all employment decisions are based only on valid job requirements.

Employees and applicants shall not be subjected to harassment, intimidation, threats, coercion or discrimination because they have engaged in or may engage in any of the following activities: (1) filing a complaint; (2) assisting or participating in an investigation, compliance evaluation, hearing, or any other activity related to the administration of the affirmative action provisions of the Vietnam Era Veterans’ Readjustment Act of 1974, as amended ("VEVRAA") or any other federal, state or local law requiring equal opportunity for veterans; (3) opposing any act or practice made unlawful by VEVRAA or its implementing regulations or any other federal, state or local law requiring equal opportunity for veterans; or (4) exercising any other right protected by VEVRAA or its implementing regulations.

Reasonable accommodations shall be made to the known physical or mental limitations of a qualified special disabled veteran employee or applicant unless such accommodation would impose an undue hardship on the conduct of the College’s educational mission or operations.

If you wish to identify yourself as a disabled Veteran, an Armed Forces service medal Veteran, other protected Veteran or a recently separated Veteran, you may complete the Self-Identification Veteran Status form and return it to the Office of Diversity and Equity, Room M2-3.

3.8.4 Prohibition on Sexual Misconduct, Relationship Violence, and Stalking

In accordance with the College’s Policy Against Sexual Misconduct, Relationship Violence, and Stalking (“Policy”), the Community College of Philadelphia (“College”) prohibits sexual misconduct, relationship violence, and stalking by or against any student, faculty, administrator, staff, employee, vendor, contractor, volunteer, or visitor to the College.  Conduct prohibited under the Policy includes sexual assault, sexual harassment, sexual exploitation, sexual violence, dating violence, domestic violence, and stalking.  The College also prohibits retaliation against any person for filing a report or participating in the investigation or disciplinary process related to a report filed pursuant to the Policy. 

Full Policy

The full Policy Against Sexual Misconduct, Relationship Violence, and Stalking, including detailed definitions of the prohibited conduct, and information regarding the investigation/disciplinary process, interim measures, and other resources available to the College community, is available on the MyCCP website under College Policies and Procedures, Policy # 358 (www.myccp.online/college-policies-and-procedures).    Hard copies are also available in the Office of Diversity and Equity, the Office of the Dean of Students, and the Department of Safety and Security.  Individuals who file a report under the Policy will be provided with a copy or a link to this policy on the College’s website.

Administration and Training

The College’s Title IX Coordinator is responsible for overseeing the administration of the College’s Policy Against Sexual Misconduct, Relationship Violence, and Stalking, training regarding the Policy, and the College’s response to reports made pursuant to the Policy.  Allegations of sexual misconduct, relationship violence, and stalking will also be reported to the Director of Safety and Security when required.

Where to Report Prohibited Conduct

Individuals may report conduct prohibited by the Policy to the following offices or departments:

Students, Employees, and Third Parties May File Reports with:

Leila Lawrence
Director of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion and Title IX Coordinator
Mint Building, Room M2-3
1700 Spring Garden Street
Philadelphia, PA 19130
(215) 751-8036

OR

Department of Safety and Security
Mint Building, Room MG-12
1700 Spring Garden Street
Philadelphia, PA 19130
(215) 751-8111 or X5555

Students May Also File Reports with: 

Office of the Dean of Students
Winnet Student Life Building, Room S1-10
1700 Spring Garden Street
Philadelphia, PA 19130
(215) 751-8161

Note:  In the event of an emergency, individuals should contact the Department of Safety and Security at (215) 751-8111 or X5555 (for on-campus emergencies only) or dial 911

Responsible Employees

All College employees are designated as Responsible Employees who are required to report to the Title IX Coordinator when they become aware of any alleged violation of the Policy affecting the College community. 

Anonymous Reporting

Filing a report with one of the offices or departments designated above is strongly encouraged, however, anonymous reports may be made using the College’s EthicsPoint System (www.ethicspoint.com) or with the Department of Safety and Security’s Online Reporting System, which may be accessed via the Department of Safety and Security webpage on MyCCP (www.myccp.online/safety-and-security/contact-safety-and-security). The College’s ability to investigate and resolve anonymous reports may be limited depending upon the amount of information provided.

Investigation/Disciplinary Procedures

The College will take prompt and appropriate steps to investigate and remedy reports.  The offices responsible for investigating reports are as follows:

Alleged Student Perpetrators

The Judicial Affairs Officer (within the Office of the Dean of Students) will administer the investigation/disciplinary process for reports involving alleged student perpetrators, which will be in accordance with the procedures set forth in the Student Code of Conduct.

Alleged Employee or Third Party Perpetrators

The Title IX Coordinator will administer the investigation/disciplinary process for reports involving alleged employee or third party perpetrators which will be in accordance with the procedures set forth in the Anti-Discrimination and Harassment Complaint Policy, the Employee Handbook, and/or the relevant Collective Bargaining Agreement, as applicable.

Confidentiality

The College will protect the privacy of all parties involved in a report made under the Policy to the extent permitted by applicable law and subject to the College’s reporting obligations.  Information regarding reports and the investigation or disciplinary process will be kept as confidential as possible, and shared only on a need to know basis.

Interim Measures

The College will implement reasonable interim measures as appropriate pending the final outcome of any investigation/disciplinary proceeding to ensure continued adequate access to educational and/or work opportunities.

3.8.5 Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (GINA)

Title II of the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008 (GINA) protects applicants and employees from discrimination based on genetic information in hiring, promotion, discharge, pay, fringe benefits, job training, classification, referral, and other aspects of employment. GINA also restricts employers’ acquisition of genetic information and strictly limits disclosure of genetic information. Genetic information includes information about genetic tests of applicants, employees, or their family members; the manifestation of diseases or disorders in family members (family medical history); and requests for or receipt of genetic services by applicants, employees, or their family members.

3.8.6 Service Animal Policy

Purpose

The purpose of this policy is to provide the College community with guidelines for the use of service animals on campus. This policy will assist in the following:

  • Understanding the rights of students, employees, and visitors to use service animals on campus
  • Providing a framework for managing service animals on campus

Accountability

Under the direction of the President, the ADA Coordinator (Director of Diversity and Equity) and the Director for the Center on Disability shall ensure compliance with the policy. The Vice Presidents, Deans, and all other supervisory staff shall implement this policy.

Policy Statement

It is the policy of the Community College of Philadelphia that service animals assisting individuals with disabilities and service animals in training accompanied by their trainers are generally permitted in all facilities, programs, and activities where members of the public or students, as

applicable, are otherwise permitted, except as described below or otherwise governed by applicable law. 

Definition of Service Animal

A “service animal” is generally defined as:

  • A dog that has been individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability, including a physical, sensory, psychiatric, intellectual, or other mental disability.
  • The work or task(s) performed by the service animal must be directly related to the person’s disability. Examples include, but are not limited to guiding individuals with vision loss, alerting individuals with hearing loss to the presence of people or sounds, providing non-violent protection or rescue work, pulling a wheelchair, or retrieving items.

Other animals, whether wild or domestic, trained or untrained, generally do not qualify as service animals.

Application of Policy

This policy applies to service animals accompanying individuals with disabilities, and service animals in training accompanied by their trainer.  Individuals with disabilities and service animal trainers accompanied by service animals are referred to throughout this policy as “handlers.” 

To view the policy in its entirely, please review the Service Animal Policy

3.9 Dress, Grooming and Personal Hygiene

The College believes that a professional image enhances our mission, vision, values and our goal of providing a quality education to all students.
                        
The College requests that all staff dress professionally and appropriately for their positions and job function as dictated by safety and common sense. Employees must wear uniforms where the job or department requires it. For example, Security staff and Environmental Services staff must wear the required uniform as mandated by their departments.

Staff are expected to observe appropriate levels of personal grooming and hygiene

3.10 Drug and Alcohol Free Workplace 

It is the policy of the Community College of Philadelphia to maintain a drug-free workplace in compliance with the Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988. This institution is committed to protecting the safety, health, and well-being of its employees, students, and all people who come into contact with its workplace and property and/or use its services. Recognizing that alcohol and drug abuse pose a direct threat to this goal, this institution is committed to assuring a drug-free environment for all of its employees and students.

The College prohibits the unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensation, possession or use of a controlled substance, including alcohol, in the workplace, as defined in the Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988. Additionally, while the College respects the privacy of its employees, it also recognizes that it has an obligation to maintain a drug/alcohol free workplace because substance abuse can have a harmful effect on the learning and work environment. Therefore, employees are expected to report for work physically and mentally able to safely and effectively perform their essential functions. Compliance with this requirement is considered to be an essential job qualification for all faculty and staff. Violation of this policy, or conviction, may result in disciplinary action up to and including termination.

An Employee Assistance Program (EAP) has been established to provide professional counseling and rehabilitation programs for employees in need of these services due to alcohol and/or substance abuse. Within thirty (30) days of receiving notification of an employee's drug statute conviction, the College will initiate appropriate personnel actions which may include imposing a sanction or requiring the satisfactory participation in a drug abuse assistance or rehabilitation program through the EAP or another approved agency.

As a condition of employment, all employees must abide by the above policy statement. Any employee who is convicted of any drug violation in the workplace must inform the Associate Vice President for Human Resources within five (5) days of the conviction. The College is required to notify the proper federal agency of this conviction within ten (10) days of receiving a notice of conviction from the employee.

College officials will cooperate with local, state, and federal authorities to ensure compliance with laws for unlawful use, possession, manufacture, distribution, or sale of illicit drugs or alcohol and will advise employees that convictions or violations of these laws can lead to fines and/or imprisonment.

This policy statement does not alter any rights of employees which exist under applicable collective bargaining agreements.

Drug & Alcohol: Student Standard

Community College of Philadelphia is dedicated to providing a quality comprehensive educational program designed to meet and balance the diverse and changing educational, social, economic, and cultural needs of the community while providing a safe and healthful environment. The College is committed not only to learning and to the advancement of knowledge but also to the education of ethically sensitive and responsible persons. The College seeks to achieve these goals through a sound educational program and through rules and regulations governing student life that encourage responsibility and respect for the rights and viewpoints of others.

Therefore, the use, sale, distribution, possession of alcohol or any drug, including prescription medication used in an unauthorized manner, is strictly prohibited and may result in disciplinary action up to, and including, expulsion.

The College believes that students are adults who are responsible for their own actions, and who should be free to pursue their educational objectives in an environment that promotes learning, protects the integrity of the academic process, and protects the learning community.

The College’s rules and regulations concerning student conduct may be found within the Student Code of Conduct via the Student Handbook (also available online). These rules and regulations are in effect when attending or participating in any class or activity sponsored by the College either on campus or at an off-campus event.

Drug & Alcohol Abuse Prevention Program

Community College of Philadelphia is committed to providing its students and employees a drug and alcohol free workplace and learning environment to promote the reputation of the College and its employees as responsible citizens of public trust, and to provide a consistent model of substance-free behavior for students.

The College shall provide a safe, responsive environment for all students and employees. Employees and students are informed of the program and policy by means of the website, student handbook, and electronic mail. Annually, employees and students are made aware of the College’s Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention Program and Policy which provides access to the following information:

The College has established a Drug and Alcohol Prevention Program to inform its faculty, staff, and students about the dangers of drug and alcohol abuse, penalties that may be imposed for drug and alcohol abuse violations, and available resources to combat drug and alcohol related issues.

Biennial Review

The College will review this policy on a biennial basis. A biennial review shall be conducted: (1) to determine the effectiveness of the policy and (2) to ensure that the policy has been implemented consistently. Should the College Administration deem it necessary to review or revise the policy at that time or any time prior to a scheduled biennial review, the Administration shall prepare revisions consistent with College policy development practices. All biennial review documents shall remain on file for compliance purposes.

Distribution to Students

Students will be informed about the Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention Policy at the New Student Orientation sessions, as well as through communications by email and pamphlets from Student Life to enrolled credit students each semester and online announcement. This will include information about health risks associated with drug and alcohol use, standards of conduct expected of students, a description of sanctions for violation of state, federal, local laws relating to the use, possession, sale or distribution of drugs and alcohol, the College’s Counseling Center, and community resources available to assist students dealing with issues related to drug and alcohol use and/or abuse.

In subsequent years during a student’s enrollment in the school, they will be reminded of the policy by email and on the College’s internal web page. To the extent there are changes to the policy at any time, students will be sent a notification via email.

Preventing Drug & Alcohol Abuse:  Health Risk

The use and abuse of alcohol and drugs pose significant physical and mental health risks. Preventing drug abuse and excessive alcohol use increases people’s chances of living long, healthy, and productive lives. Excessive alcohol use includes binge drinking (i.e., five or more drinks during a single occasion for men, four or more drinks during a single occasion for women), underage drinking, drinking while pregnant, and alcohol impaired driving. Drug abuse includes any inappropriate use of pharmaceuticals (both prescription and over-the counter drugs) and any use of illicit drugs. Alcohol and other drug use can impede judgment and lead to harmful risk-taking behavior. Preventing drug abuse and excessive alcohol use improves quality of life, academic performance, workplace productivity, and military preparedness; reduces crime and criminal justice expenses; reduces motor vehicle crashes and fatalities; and lowers health care costs for acute and chronic conditions. The National Institution of Drug Abuse provides an overview of various drugs and their effects on individuals. Below is a list of commonly abused substances:

  • Alcohol: Although legal, alcohol is a toxic substance, particularly to a developing fetus when a mother consumes this drug during pregnancy.
  • Amphetamines: This group of drugs comes in many forms, from prescription medications like methylphenidate (Ritalin, Concerta) and dextroamphetamine and amphetamine (Adderall) to illegally manufactured drugs like methamphetamine ("meth"). Overdose of any of these substances can result in seizure and death
  • Anabolic steroids: A group of substances abused by bodybuilders and other athletes, this group of drugs can lead to significant psychological effects like aggression and paranoia, as well as other long-term physical effects like infertility and organ failure.
  • Caffeine: While it is consumed by many, coffee, tea and soda drinkers, when consumed in excess this substance can produce palpitations, insomnia, tremors and significant anxiety.
  • Cannabis: More commonly called “marijuana,” the scientific name for cannabis is tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). In addition to the negative effects the drug itself can produce (for example, infertility, paranoia, lack of motivation), the fact that it is commonly mixed ("cut") with other substances so drug dealers can make more money selling the diluted substance or expose the user to more addictive drugs exposes the marijuana user to the dangers associated with those added substances. Examples of ingredients that marijuana is commonly cut with include baby powder, oregano, embalming fluid, PCP, opiates, and cocaine.
  • Cocaine: A drug that tends to stimulate the nervous system, cocaine can be snorted in powder form, smoked when in the form of rocks (crack cocaine), or injected when made into a liquid.
  • Ecstasy: Also called MDMA to denote its chemical composition (methylenedioxymethamphetamine), this drug tends to create a sense of euphoria and an expansive love or desire to nurture others. In overdose, it can increase body temperature to the point of being fatal.
  • Hallucinogens: Examples include LSD and mescaline, as well as so-called naturally occurring hallucinogens like certain mushrooms, these drugs can be dangerous in their ability to alter the perceptions of the user. For example, a person who is intoxicated with a hallucinogen may perceive danger where there is none and to think that situations that are truly dangerous are not. Those misperceptions can result in dangerous behaviors (like jumping out of a window because the individual thinks they are riding on an elephant that can fly).
  • Inhalants: One of the most commonly abused group of substances due to its accessibility, inhalants are usually contained in household cleaners, like ammonia, bleach, and other substances that emit fumes. Brain damage, even to the point of death, can result from using an inhalant just once or over the course of time, depending on the individual.
  • Nicotine: The addictive substance found in cigarettes, nicotine is actually one of the most habit-forming substances that exist. In fact, nicotine addiction is often compared to the intense addictiveness associated with opiates like heroin.
  • Opiates: This group is also called narcotics and includes drugs like heroin, codeine, Vicodin, Percocet, and Percodan. This group of substances sharply decreases the functioning of the nervous system. The lethality of opiates is often the result of the abuser having to use increasingly higher amounts to achieve the same level of intoxication, ultimately to the point that the dose needed to get high is the same as the dose that is lethal for that individual by halting the person's breathing (respiratory arrest).
  • Phencyclidine: Commonly referred to as PCP, this drug can cause the user to feel extremely paranoid, become quite aggressive and to have an unusual amount of physical strength. This can make the individual quite dangerous to others.
  • Sedative, hypnotic, or anti-anxiety drugs: As these substances quell or depress the nervous system, they can cause death by respiratory arrest of the person who either uses these drugs in overdose or who mixes one or more of these drugs with another nervous system depressant drug (like alcohol or an opiate).

For more information please visit the following link:  https://www.drugabuse.gov/drugs-abuse/alcohol

Drug & Alcohol Counseling:  Supports Available to Students

Counselors are available for students at the College’s campuses, on a confidential basis, to respond to student needs and concerns related to drug and alcohol use. For information about counseling services at the College, contact (215) 751-8169 or visit the Counseling Center in the Bonnell Building (BG-7).

In addition to on-campus support programs and resources, below are available treatment centers that may be helpful in addressing issues of mental health and substance abuse:

Saint Jude Retreats
1 (888) 424-2626 (Office Number)

www.saintjuderetreats.com

Psychological Research Center
1509 Cecil B. Moore Avenue
Philadelphia, PA 19121
(215) 204-7100
psc@temple.edu

Addiction Medicine and Health Advocates, Inc.
928 Market Street
Philadelphia, PA 19107
(215) 923-4202

Belmont Center for Comprehensive Treatment - Drummond Road
10360 Drummond Road
Philadelphia, PA 19154
(215) 632-6400

Relevant Alcohol & Drug Laws & Sanctions

In addition to College disciplinary actions and applicable sanctions, any student who violates this policy may be subject to criminal prosecution and penalties under applicable local, state, and federal laws. Where appropriate or necessary, College officials will cooperate with local, state, and federal authorities to ensure compliance with laws for unlawful use, possession manufacture, distribution or sale of illicit drugs or alcohol and will advise employees and students that convictions or violations of these laws can lead to fines and/or imprisonment.

The following is a brief review of the legal sanctions under local, state, and federal law for the unlawful possession or distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol.

Alcohol

The Pennsylvania Liquor Control Board website explains alcohol and the law in the state of Pennsylvania, programs and resources available, as well as provides information for parents. (Source: University of Pennsylvania, 2012)

The Pennsylvania Liquor Code, 47 Pa., C.S.A., 1-101 et seq., controls the possession and sale of alcoholic beverages within the Commonwealth. The Code, as well as portions of the Pennsylvania Statutes pertaining to crimes and offenses involving minors, 18 Pa., C.S.A. 6307 et seq., provides the following:

  1. It is a summary offense for a person under the age of twenty-one to attempt to purchase, consume, possess or knowingly and intentionally transport any liquor or malt or brewed beverages. Penalty for a first offense is suspension of driving privileges for 90 days, a fine up to $300 and imprisonment for up to 90 days; for a second offense, suspension of driving privileges for one year, a fine up to $500, and imprisonment for up to one year; for subsequent offense, suspension of driving privileges for two years, a fine up to $500 and imprisonment for up to one year. Multiple sentences involving suspension of driving privileges must be served consecutively.
  2. It is a crime intentionally and knowingly to sell or intentionally and knowingly to furnish or to purchase with the intent to sell or furnish, any liquor or malt or brewed beverages to any minor (under the age of twenty-one). “Furnish” means to supply, give or provide to, or allow a minor to possess on premises or property owned or controlled by the person charged. Penalty for a first violation is $1,000; $2,500 for each subsequent violation; imprisonment for up to one year for any violation.
  3. It is a crime for any person under twenty-one years of age to possess an identification card falsely identifying that person as being twenty-one years of age or older, or to obtain or attempt to obtain liquor or malt or brewed beverages by using a false identification card. Penalties are stated in (1) above.
  4. It is a crime intentionally, knowingly or recklessly to manufacture, make, alter, sell or attempt to sell an identification card falsely representing the identity, birth date, or age of another. Minimum fine is $1,000 for first violation; $2,500 for subsequent violations; imprisonment for up to one year for any violation.
  5. It is a crime to misrepresent one’s age knowingly and falsely to obtain liquor or malt or brewed beverages. Penalties are as stated in (1) above.
  6. It is a crime knowingly, willfully and falsely to represent that another is of legal age to obtain liquor or malt or brewed beverages. Penalty is a minimum fine of $300 and imprisonment for up to one year.
  7. It is a crime to hire, request or induce any minor to purchase liquor or malt or brewed beverages. Penalty is a minimum fine of $300 and imprisonment for up to one year.
  8. Sales without a license or purchases from an unlicensed source of liquor or malt or brewed beverages are prohibited.
  9. It is unlawful to possess or transport liquor or alcohol within the Commonwealth unless it has been purchased from a State Store or in accordance with Liquor Control Board regulations.
  10. The use in any advertisement of alcoholic beverages of any subject matter, language or slogan directed to minors to promote consumption of alcoholic beverages is prohibited.

The College will cooperate with the appropriate law enforcement authorities for violations of any of the above-mentioned laws by an employee in the workplace or student.

Drugs & Controlled Substances

The United States Department of Education in Section 484(r) of the Higher Education Reconciliation Act explains the circumstances related to convictions of controlled substances that may affect or suspend a student’s eligibility for financial aid and assistance. The suspension of eligibility for federal student aid ranges from as much as one year to an indefinite period of time, depending upon the number and type of convictions.

  1. The Controlled Substance, Drug, Device and Cosmetic Act, 35 Pa. C.S.A. 780-101 et seq., sets up five schedules of controlled substances based on dangerousness and medical uses. It prohibits the manufacture, distribution, sale or acquisition by misrepresentation or forgery of controlled substances except in accordance with the Act, as well as the knowing possession of controlled substances unlawfully acquired. Penalties for first-time 8 violators of the Act range from thirty days imprisonment, $500 fine, or both, for possession or distribution of a small amount of marijuana or hashish, not for sale, to fifteen years or $250,000 or both for the manufacture or delivery of a Schedule I or II narcotic. A person over eighteen years of age who is convicted for violating The Controlled Substance, Drug, Device and Cosmetic Act, shall be sentenced to a minimum of at least one year total confinement if the delivery or possession with intent to deliver of the controlled substance was to a minor. If the offense is committed within 1,000 feet of the real property on which a college is located, the person shall be sentenced to an additional minimum sentence of at least two years total confinement.
  2. The Pharmacy Act of 1961, 63 Pa. C.S.A. 390-8 makes it unlawful to procure or attempt to procure drugs by fraud, deceit, misrepresentation or subterfuge or by forgery or alteration of a prescription. The first offense is a misdemeanor, with a maximum penalty of one year’s imprisonment, a $5,000 fine, or both.
  3. The Vehicle Code, 75 PA, C.S.A. 3101 et seq., which was amended effective July 1, 1977, prohibits driving under the influence of alcohol or a controlled substance, or both, if the driver thereby is rendered incapable of safe driving. A police officer is empowered to arrest without a warrant any person whom he or she has probable cause to believe has committed a violation, even though the officer may not have been present when the violation was committed. A person so arrested is deemed to have consented to a test of breath or blood for the purpose of determining alcoholic content, and if a violation is found, it carries the penalties of a misdemeanor of the second degree, which includes imprisonment for a maximum of thirty days.
  4. The Federal drug laws, The Controlled Substances Act, 21 U.S.C. 801 et seq., are similar to the Pennsylvania Controlled Substance, Drug, Device, and Cosmetic Act, but contain, for the most part, more severe penalties. Schedules of controlled substance are established, and it is made unlawful knowingly or intentionally to manufacture, distribute, dispense, or possess with intent to distribute or dispense a controlled substance. If the quantity of controlled substance is large (e.g. 1,000 kg of a mixture or substance containing marijuana), the maximum penalties are life imprisonment, a $4,000,000 fine, or both. Lesser quantities of controlled substance (e.g. 100 kg of a mixture or substance containing marijuana) result in maximum penalties of life imprisonment, a $2,000,000 fine, or both. According to state law, the distribution of 30 grams or less of marijuana for no remuneration or simple possession of a controlled substance carries a maximum of 30 days imprisonment, a $500 fine, or both, with the penalties for the second offense possibly doubling. Conditional release with conviction is possible for first offenders. Distribution to minors may carry double penalty.
  5. Distribution or manufacture of a controlled substance in or on or within 1,000 feet of the property of a school or college may result in imprisonment of between two and four years.

Students who have been convicted under state or federal law involving the possession or sale of a controlled substance are ineligible for federal student aid for specific periods 9 (ranging from one year to an indefinite period depending on the nature of the offense and whether the student is a repeat offender)

Alcoholic beverages are not to be sold, served, used or possessed in any of the facilities of the College. Exception to this policy may be made only in the event that the Board of Trustees deems it appropriate.

View the Alcoholic Beverages Policy

View the Drug-Free Workplace, Alcohol, and Other Drug Abuse Prevention Policy

3.11 Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) 

In compliance with the federal Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993 (FMLA), the College gives eligible faculty and staff up to 12 weeks of unpaid, job-protected leave in a specified 12-month period for qualifying family and medical reasons.

Eligibility for FMLA:

To be eligible for unpaid leave under FMLA, you must meet all of the following conditions:

  1. You must have worked at the College for a total of 12 months; and
  2. You must have worked at the College for at least 1,250 hours over the 12-month period prior to the date leave is requested to commence.

Qualifying Unpaid Leave Under FMLA:

Qualifying family and medical reasons include the following:

  • The birth and care of your new-born child, newly adopted child, or newly obtained foster child; or
  • To care for an immediate family member (spouse, son or daughter, or parent) who has a serious health condition; or
  • To take medical leave when you are unable to work because of your own serious health condition; or
  • To care for a covered family member who has incurred an injury or illness in the line of duty while on active duty in the Armed Forces, provided that such injury or illness may render the family member medically unfit to perform duties of the member's office, grade, rank or rating.
  • Qualifying exigency due to a family member in the military service called up for deployment.

Coverage

An eligible employee of the College is entitled to 12 weeks of unpaid job-protected leave for certain family and medical reasons. You may be eligible for 26 weeks of unpaid leave in a single twelve month period to care for a military service family member, i.e. son, daughter, spouse, parent or next of kin (nearest blood relative). You are not required to take the 12 or 26 weeks consecutively. If you need to take the leave in increments, please discuss this with your supervisor and notify the Human Resources Department.

For the full policy, including specific information about procedures, medical certification and job restoration, please refer to the links below. You can also access the FMLA application and certification forms through these links. You may also contact the HR Benefits Office at extension 8208 to answer any questions you may have concerning FMLA.

http://www.ccp.edu/site/offices/human_resources/forms.php

/sites/default/files/documents/HumanResources/fmla-ee-rights.pdf 

3.12 Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA)

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (“FERPA”) is intended to ensure students the right to inspect, review, and control access to student educational records maintained by an educational institution.

Community College of Philadelphia complies with the requirements of FERPA. Students are notified of their rights under FERPA annually by publication in the College catalog and/or registration announcements.

All faculty and staff are expected to manage student records in their custody in accordance with all FERPA regulations.

Questions or concerns regarding FERPA guidelines and regulations should be directed to the General Counsel, at extension 8913.

The link to the College Catalog information regarding FERPA is:
http://ccp.edu/college-catalog/college-policies-and-procedures/student-rights-and-responsibilities#Privacy

3.13 Handling of Employee Personal Information 

Except as required by law, the only data the College will publicly release about an employee without written consent is the employee’s job title and dates of employment.  The Human Resources Department will release the following data upon written request when the request is accompanied by a release of information form signed by the employee:  employment status, job title, length of employment and salary. Addresses and telephone numbers will be released only to faculty and staff of the College on a need-to-know basis. Human Resources will release other personal data only upon receipt of a t subpoena.  All information about employee health status is treated in a confidential manner consistent with relevant statutes. 

3.14 HIPAA Notice of Privacy Practices

The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA) is a federal law that established guidelines for protecting private personal health information (protected health information, or “PHI”). Covered entities such as an employer’s health plan, health care providers and health care clearinghouses must protect identifiable health information that is transmitted electronically, by paper or via verbal communication.

The College is required by applicable federal and state laws to maintain the privacy of your PHI and has put procedures in place to maintain your privacy. The College is required to give each health benefit plan participant a notice about our privacy practices, our legal duties, your rights and the rights of your dependents concerning PHI.

It is important to know that there are some records that are not covered by the HIPAA guidelines. They include workers’ compensation records, family medical leave records, sick leave doctor notes, fitness-for-duty notices, and occupational safety and health records.

The College reserves the right to change the privacy practices at any time according to changes in applicable laws. Changes in privacy practices will be communicated to faculty and staff and their dependents at the time of the change.

If you feel that your rights under HIPAA have been violated, please contact the HIPAA Privacy Officer, the Associate Vice President for Human Resources, at extension 8083.

You may obtain a printed copy of the privacy notice at any time by contacting the Human Resources department or for more information, please see the HIPAA Privacy Notice and the PHI Privacy notice.

HIPAANOTICEPRIVACYPRACTICE.pdf 

3.15 Pandemic Preparedness 

The College maintains a pandemic preparedness policy which applies to a period of flu pandemic as declared by the Center for Disease Control. The College’s usual policies for illness and leave apply in all other circumstances. 

Please review the policy at: http://path.ccp.edu/site/offices/human_resources/PandemicPrepardness.php

3.16 Personnel Records and Files

An official personnel file on each employee is kept in the Human Resources Department. These are the only official personnel files. Supervisors may keep supervisory files elsewhere. Each employee may review his/her own personnel file by setting up an appointment (via written request with one-day advance notice) with a representative of the Human Resources Department. Pre-employment application materials, background check documentation and recommendations are excluded from this file and may not be examined.

Access to an employee’s personnel file is restricted to certain employees who have a need to examine it as part of their job function. Medical information is kept in a separate file apart from the official personnel file.  Information dealing with medical examinations and/or medical conditions is not available for viewing unless the employee authorizes access.

Employees may examine their personnel files periodically by contacting the Associate Vice President for Human Resources or the Director of Human Resources.

3.17 Professional Conduct 

As employees of a public institution, faculty and staff must perform their duties ethically and legally. All faculty and staff have the responsibility to make themselves familiar with, and abide by, the applicable laws and regulations which affect their work, the policies of the Board, and administrative regulations. All staff and faculty are expected to carry out their assigned duties; support and enforce College policies, procedures and regulations; submit required reports; and contribute to the education and development of the College’s students.

Individuals who work together have an impact on each other’s performance, productivity, and personal satisfaction in their jobs. In addition, how faculty and staff act toward students, vendors and visitors to our campus will influence whether those relationships are successful for our College.

3.18 Workplace Surveillance and Searches 

The College may authorize the use of reasonable surveillance and search measures as necessary to ensure a safe work environment and in compliance with College policies and law. Subject to applicable law, the College reserves the right to inspect and search all work areas, desks, computers, College-owned cell phones, file cabinets, lockers, or other containers leaving College premises. In addition, all records contained in College-owned devices, including computers, iPads, cellular devices and other storage devices (including removable media) are open to inspection by the College in accordance with College policies, subject to applicable legal requirements.

3.19 Hours at Work

All time during working hours must be dedicated to accomplishing your job responsibilities. Use of College property for personal use, including internet, telephone, computers and other College-owned devices should be limited to non-working time such as during lunch or authorized breaks. Users of College computer systems and other College-owned devices are subject to the same standards that apply to other employee communications, as noted above, and other College policies and procedures such as the Non-Discrimination and Harassment policies, and as otherwise provided in the Acceptable Use Policy (see Section 4.10).

Therefore, employees should not use a CCP address (physical or electronic) to receive or send personal communications. Communication systems may not be used to solicit or recruit for commercial ventures, religious or political causes, outside organizations, or other non-job-related solicitations.

Any employee who uses the computer systems or other communication systems for improper purposes shall be subject to disciplinary action, up to and including discharge. Any employee who receives materials that he or she believes violates a College policy should contact the Chief Information Officer (CIO) or the Associate Vice President for Human Resources.

3.20 Cameras, Camera Phones and Other Recording Devices

Many cell phones today come with built-in recording capabilities, including cameras and video and audio recording devices. Although these features are fun for personal use, using them in the workplace can lead to violations of privacy and breaches of employee and/or student confidentiality. Unauthorized use of any type of camera, video or audio devices and/or the unauthorized taking of photographs of private individual work spaces at the College or at any of the College’s locations is strictly prohibited.

3.21 Social Media and Social Networking 

The College supports the use of blogs and social networking sites by College departments and/or programs.

Faculty and staff must recognize that all information posted on a College department/program blog and/or social networking site must be in compliance with the College’s Acceptable Use Policy for Interactive Systems and all other College policies follow acceptable social behaviors and comply with federal and state regulations.

College department/program blogs and social networking websites/pages created in the College's name are representatives of Community College of Philadelphia and therefore subject to the guidelines, policies and branding of the College.

Policy Governing the Use and Duplication of Software
Policy for Responsible Computing
Acceptable Use Policy for Interactive Systems

Also see Section 4.4 Copyrights and Intellectual Property Rights of the College in this Handbook.

3.22 Travel Authorization and Reimbursement

3.22.1 Purpose

To establish guidelines for all employees and Trustees to obtain approval and reimbursement of College-related travel and business expenses. 

3.22.2 Policy

Community College of Philadelphia employees or Trustees may be authorized to attend professional conferences, meetings, workshops and development seminars at the College’s expense and/or during normally assigned working hours if the purpose of such travel is in accordance with the mission, goals, objectives and priorities of the College and if funds to support such travel are available in the appropriate budget.

3.22.3 Procedure

Authorization

  1. The respective Vice President, Dean, Director, Associate Vice President, Assistant Vice President or President is authorized to permit personnel to travel at College expense if the purpose of such travel is in accordance with the objectives of the College and if funds are available in the appropriate budget for such travel. A Travel Authorization Request form must be completed by the person requesting approval for all travel explaining the purpose of the trip and the expected benefits to the College.
  2. Travel by Trustees must be approved by the Chair of the Board or, the Executive Committee of the Board.
  3. Travel costs and any interference with performance of duties must be justified by offsetting benefit to the College and/or to the individual’s professional development.
  4. The mode of travel selected shall be that which is most practical and economical.
  5. All travel outside the City of Philadelphia requiring a hotel stay requires the prior written approval of the Vice President, Dean, Director, Associate Vice President, Assistant Vice President or President.

Initiating the Travel Request

All employees requesting travel authorization must complete the Travel Authorization Request form and submit it to their Supervisor and other authorized approver per Section III A.1. for approval. All Trustees must complete the Travel Authorization Request form and submit to the Chair of the Board or the Executive Committee of the Board for approval. No form will be considered complete unless all required signatures for authorization have been obtained. The travel authorization form should be submitted as soon as possible but is required no later than ten (10) business days prior to the travel date to allow time for Purchasing to make arrangements if requested.

Making Travel Arrangements

  1. Travel arrangements should be made by the traveler with exception of vehicle rentals. The Purchasing Department is available to assist with arrangements for hotel, rail and airfare. Purchasing may have discount contract rates available to employees or trustees. Conference registration is to be arranged by the traveler.
  2. Traveler must select the lowest possible coach airfare or train fare that meets the business needs of the College by considering Saturday night stays or other alternatives.
  3. If the traveler’s plans change and the airline ticket is no longer of use, the traveler must immediately contact Purchasing. If the ticket has value, it must be used for College business only.
  4. Transportation to and from airports and train stations
    1. Travelers must use the most practical and economical mode of ground transportation to and from airports and train stations (e.g., hotel and airport shuttle services, shared ground transportation, etc.).
    2. Travelers must use the most practical and economical mode of ground transportation to and from their residence. Shuttle service is permitted if it is the most cost effective method.
  5. If the traveler takes an indirect route for other than a college business purpose, or interrupts a direct route of travel, the traveler is responsible for all costs above and beyond those that would have been incurred by traveling the direct route.
  6. Vehicle Rental
    1. Rentals must be arranged by the Purchasing Department.
    2. If driving is the most efficient and cost-effective mode of travel and a rental car is utilized, the rental should be an appropriately sized vehicle.
    3.  If a rental accident occurs, the traveler should immediately contact:
      1. the vehicle rental company, in accordance with the company's requirements for reporting accidents;
      2. local authorities, as required;
      3. his/her department head;
      4. Purchasing (no later than 24 hours); and
      5. Security.
    4. The College will not provide reimbursement if the rental is not arranged by the Purchasing Department.
  7. Personal Vehicles
  8. If the approved mode of travel is by personal automobile, the traveler will be reimbursed based on the IRS allowable reimbursement rate for business miles plus expenses related to tolls and parking. (See policy #210 - Personal Automobile Mileage Reimbursement). Business miles are based on the most direct route. At the conclusion of the trip, the traveler must complete the Travel Reimbursement form indicating the expenses associated with the travel and a check request form and submit it to the Controller’s Office along with all accompanying receipts for which reimbursement is sought (i.e., tolls and parking). The traveler will be responsible for all fuel, towing and maintenance costs related to his/her private automobile; and for carrying adequate personal insurance coverage for his/her vehicle and occupants.
    1. A traveler should review his/her personal insurance coverage prior to using his or her vehicle for college business and consult with his/her insurance agent to determine appropriate coverage. The traveler’s insurance is the primary insurance coverage when using a personal vehicle for travel related to College business. Traveler must provide proof of insurance with the Travel Authorization Request form if driving their own vehicle.
    2. The College will not provide reimbursement for repairs to personal cars, even if the costs result from college business travel or travel between the personal residence and regular work location of traveler.
    3. If a personal car is involved in an accident while on College business travel, the traveler should immediately contact:
      1. his/her insurance company;
      2. local authorities, as required;
      3. his/her department head;
      4. Purchasing (by the next business day); and
      5. Security.
  9. Lodging
    1. When attending a conference, all attempts should be made to reserve rooms at the conference site. If that is not possible, reservations will be made at the closest hotel charging at or below the federal rate for lodging. See maximum lodging rates for all U.S. States, territories, and possessions established by the U.S. General Services Administration for allowable lodging expenses (http://gsa.gov/portal/category/100120).
    2. Travelers are encouraged to make their own hotel arrangements. However, in the event that the Controller’s Office will issue a check for the cost of the hotel stay, all checks will be made payable to the hotel and it will be the responsibility of the traveler to submit the request for payment to Accounts Payable in a timely fashion so it can be mailed to the hotel. Check pick-ups cannot be permitted for travel. Upon checkout, the hotel will issue the traveler a receipt indicating the applicable room rate and the total amount charged for the stay. The hotel receipt and related documentation must be submitted to the Controller’s Office immediately upon return from travel.
    3. Upon arrival at the hotel, the traveler must use their own method of payment (e.g. personal credit card) to guarantee payment for any charges above the negotiated room fee (e.g. pay-per-view, personal telephone calls, and in-room bar, dining to the extent in excess of the meal allowance below, among others).
    4. The traveler is responsible for canceling hotel room reservations when necessary. The traveler must request and record the cancellation number in case of billing disputes. Cancellation deadlines are based on the location of the property (e.g., Pacific Time Zone when the property is in California). Expenses incurred as a result of a failure to cancel a hotel reservation are the responsibility of the traveler. The Dean, Director, Org Manager or President may authorize exceptions to the traveler’s responsibility of expenses related to a lodging “no show” based on an approved written explanation indicating the reason/s for the failure to cancel the reservation in a timely manner.
  10. Meals
    1. The maximum per diem meal allowance for each full day of travel is established by the U.S. General Services Administration for allowable meal expenses (http://gsa.gov/portal/category/100120). Detailed, itemized receipts for meals including names of attendees and business purpose are required. The College will only reimburse traveler's meals that are not otherwise paid for or provided. Therefore, the College will not reimburse breakfast, lunch, or dinner if provided as part of the conference, meeting, or other business activity necessitating the travel. Without exception, the College will not reimburse the traveler or pay for any expenses related to alcoholic beverages.
  11. Tips
    The maximum per diem tip allowance is $10 per day exclusive of meals and transportation. This includes tips for baggage handling, room service, hotel maid service, etc. Receipts for tips are not required. However, tipping for meals may not exceed 20%.
  12. Group Travel
    Group Travel should be made through the Purchasing Department
    a. The sponsoring College department must provide a list of traveler names to the Risk Manager and Director of Security. The sponsoring department is responsible for ensuring all student travelers have obtained the necessary student travel insurance.
  13. International Travel
    1. All College-sponsored international travel involving students must follow the “Guidelines for College-Sponsored International Travel” as published by the Center for International Understanding.
    2. Currency Exchange
      - When charges are in foreign currencies, travelers must:
      1. Submit foreign expenses in U.S. dollars using the exchange rate in effect during the dates of travel;
      2. Include documentation indicating the exchange rates used to make the conversions; and
      3. For purchases made with a credit card, use the exchange rates provided by the credit card company for purchases made with a credit card.

Reimbursable and Non-Reimbursable Expenses

It is the responsibility of the traveler to obtain original itemized receipts for all allowable expenses. Accounts Payable will not reimburse the traveler for any costs without an itemized receipt. Only authorized costs, accompanied by the appropriate receipt, will be reimbursed. It is suggested that the traveler call Accounts Payable if they are unsure whether an expense will be covered.

  1. The following are examples of reimbursable expenses for College-approved travel:
    Wi-Fi if required for College business; meals; tolls; transportation to and from the airport; telephone calls related to official College business only; conference registration expenses; or other expenses associated with the travel, so long as the expense is essential to the transaction of College business and in accordance with the limits outlined in this policy.
  2. The following are examples of expenses not allowed for reimbursement:
    Alcoholic beverages, hotel gyms, mini-bars, in-room movies, entertainment, laundry, vehicle fines, and personal phone calls.
  3. Travel expense reports must be submitted to the Controller’s Office within 10 business days of the return from travel.
  4. Cash advances will not be provided unless a hardship can be demonstrated. Approval by the department’s Vice President, Dean, Director, Associate Vice President or Assistant Vice President is required.

Timing of Event and Reimbursement

Reimbursements for meals, lodging and other expenses will normally be limited to expenses incurred during the day(s) of the meeting, conference or other business activity attended by the traveler. Expenses incurred on additional days may be reimbursed if extending the period results in reduced airfare sufficient to cover the additional meals, lodging and other expenses or it is not possible to arrive and/or depart on the day(s) of the meeting, conference or other business activity attended by the traveler.

Partial Reimbursement

  1. If your expenses are partially covered by another organization, the College may accept copies of receipts in place of originals. The voucher must include the name of the organization that is paying the partial reimbursement, what is being reimbursed, and the amount reimbursed.
  2. If any meal is provided by the conference, hotel, or any other source, the traveler should reduce the per diem meal allowance by the amount in Section III C.9a. (Making Travel Arrangements) that corresponds to that meal.
  3. The per diem allocation for meals, which is intended to cover breakfast, lunch, and dinner for each full day of travel is located at http://gsa.gov/portal/category/100120

Other Means of Transportation

The College may provide reimbursement for other commercial means of transportation such as train or bus. However, reimbursements must not exceed the cost of reasonable coach airfare or other reasonable transportation costs to the same destination.

Personal Travel Combined with Business Travel

The College will only reimburse for the business portion of a trip. The traveler must provide evidence to support the business portion of the trip and the allocation between the business and personal expenses. A quote for the business-related travel must be obtained at the time of ticketing to document the incremental costs that will be treated as personal expenses. This quote must be submitted along with the Travel Request form.

Reimbursement Payment

  1. Accounts Payable will generally send reimbursements of approved expenses to employees within ten business days of the receipt of the Official Travel form (will include link to form), along with all accompanying receipts. Forms submitted for travel reimbursement must be signed by the Vice President, Dean, Director, Associate Vice President, Assistant Vice President or President.
  2. Willful violations of this policy, including falsification of expense reports, will be grounds for disciplinary action, up to and including denial of requested reimbursements and/or termination of employment.

Recruitment

The payment for travel of prospective employees and their families must receive prior written approval by the Associate Vice President of Human Resources or by the Board of Trustees if the recruitment is for the position of President.

Travel Between Sites Using Personal Vehicles

Authorized travel for operational purposes may be reimbursed according to policy #210 - Personal Automobile Mileage Reimbursement.

Local Travel

  1. Entertainment Expense
    Entertainment expenses are limited to Board of Trustees, the President, and members of the President’s Cabinet or their designee(s) incurred in connection with their job responsibilities. Local entertainment expenses may be incurred while conducting ordinary and necessary business for the College such as fundraising, public relations activities and other College events. Expenses may include meals, transportation, parking, tolls, meeting rooms and conference facilities. Business related meals charges are subject to Section III C.9. Business meals that include charges for alcoholic beverages incurred by a member of the President’s Cabinet, Board of Trustees, or Designee must be properly approved by the President and separately itemized on meal receipts. Alcohol charges are unallowable for sponsored projects (grants). Alcoholic beverages for entertainment functions held in Pennsylvania must be purchased in Pennsylvania.
  2. Business Expense
    Local business expenses include local conference or seminar fees, meals, parking fees and other out-of-pocket expenses while attending local workshops or business meetings and are subject to Section III C.9. Approval of local business expenses will follow Section III A.1.

Other

Exceptions to this policy are subject to the approval of the traveler’s Vice President and the Vice President for Business and Finance.

3.23 Workplace Violence and Weapons

3.23.1 Workplace Violence

This policy is intended to foster positive, safe, supportive human relations, create a safe, productive work environment for our academic programs and administrative services and allow a campus environment conducive to the mission of learning.

Prohibited Conduct

The College does not tolerate any type of workplace violence committed by or against employees. Employees are prohibited from making threats or engaging in violent activities. This list of behaviors, while not all inclusive, provides examples of conduct that is prohibited:

  • Causing physical injury to another person;
  • Making direct threatening remarks;
  • Aggressive, hostile or menacing behavior that creates a reasonable fear of injury to another person;
  • Intentionally damaging employer property or property of another employee;
  • Unauthorized possession of a dangerous weapon while on College property or while on College business.

Consequences of Violations of the Policy

Violators are subject to criminal prosecution and discipline, including suspension and/or termination of employment. Depending on the circumstances, the College may request law enforcement personnel to remove from the premises any employee who makes threats, exhibits threatening behavior, harasses others, attempts to intimidate employees, or intentionally damages property.

Reporting Procedures

Any potentially dangerous situations witnessed must be reported to Security. Supervisors and managers must consult with the Human Resources Department whenever there is a complaint or report of workplace violence. Situations representing imminent danger should be reported to Campus Security immediately. All reported incidents will be investigated. Reports or incidents warranting confidentiality will be handled appropriately and information will be disclosed to others only on a need-to-know basis. 

All employees are expected to cooperate with any investigation of workplace violence. Employees may be asked to provide statements regarding an incident of workplace violence to which they were a witness. 

3.23.2 Weapons Policy

The College recognizes the importance of the services provided by the local and state law enforcement agencies. The College also recognizes the authority of law enforcement entities to determine the need to arm officers. Accordingly, law enforcement personnel while on duty and acting in their official capacity are permitted to carry firearms as deemed necessary by their employer for the performance of their duties.

In all other cases, the possession or carrying of guns or other dangerous weapons or explosive material is strictly prohibited on campus. Individuals with legal authority to carry firearms who are not on campus to perform duties in their official capacity, should check them with the security office on entering the College. Possession of these items will result in immediate dismissal. (Examples of dangerous weapons include but are not limited to any firearm, stun gun, knife with three (3) inch blade or longer, explosive device, bow and arrow, brass knuckles.)

3.24 Hiring of Temporary Workers

Temporary employees may be hired to fill-in for personnel who are on leave or to fill staff positions while a search is in progress. The College also receives grants from various sources which allows for the hiring of temporary employees. A grant employee’s tenure is determined by the duration of the grant unless collective bargaining agreements provide otherwise. Benefits for temporary employees differ from benefits provided to full-time employees in certain respects. 

Employee benefit eligibility is specified in the letter of hire.

Requests for temporary employees must be directed to the Human Resources Department at extension 8035.

3.25   Contract Procedures and Authorized Signatures

The Community College of Philadelphia (the “College”) enters into a wide variety of contracts including but not limited to contracts for the purchase of goods and services, construction contracts, software license agreements, rental agreements, lease agreements, clinical and other student placement agreements, transfer and articulation agreements, event contracts, contracts to provide educational training, programs, and services to third parties, grant agreements, scholarships agreements, and numerous other forms of agreements.

For purposes of this policy, a Contract is any document that contains an agreement between the College and an outside party which imposes any kind of obligation on the College, entitles the College to a benefit, or otherwise affects the College’s rights, whether or not there is an exchange of funds between the College and the outside party.  A contract which meets this definition is subject to this policy regardless of how it is titled (e.g., a contract may also be called an agreement, memorandum of understanding, memorandum of agreement, letter of intent, letter of agreement, license, lease, etc.)  This policy also applies to any amendment, addendum, modification, correction, renewal, or extension of a contract. 

Procedures:

All contracts should be initiated well in advance of the start date for the applicable contract to allow time to follow the College’s contract procedures and negotiate the best terms and conditions for the College.  Because contracts can create various forms of liability for the College and may create other obligations for the College or impose limitations on the College, it is essential to insure that all contracts follow and comply with the following procedures to the extent applicable:

  • Contracts related to the purchase of goods and services and construction contracts must comply with the College’s Open Market Purchasing Policy Memorandum #201, the College’s other Financial Policies, and must be coordinated with the College’s Purchasing Department;
  • All contracts must comply with the College’s Conflicts of Interest Policy, Memorandum #212;
  • Contracts for software licenses and other information technology services must be reviewed by the Chief Information Officer or his/her designee;
  • Contracts which involve the purchase of goods or services over $5000 must be reviewed by the Vice President of the Division of Business and Finance or his or her designee;
  • All contracts must be reviewed by the Vice President of the Division in which they originate.  All contracts should be coordinated with the Vice President(s) of other Divisions that may be implicated by the terms of the contract;
  • All contracts must be reviewed by the Office of General Counsel;
  • Contracts covered by “Purchase and Contracts Requiring Specific Board Authorization Policy Memorandum #202” must be authorized by the Board of Trustees; and
  • All contracts must be approved by the President of the College or the Vice President designated in his/her absence.

Contracts must be made in accordance with the established policies and procedures of the College and may only be executed by the President of the College or the Vice President designated in his/her absence. A completed Contract Review Form must be attached to any contract which is submitted to the President or his/her designee for signature. 

To view the Contract Procedures and Authorized Signatures Policy (Policy #213) and to access the Contract Review Form